Important Safety Information

This page contains important safety information about:

Pulmonary Artery (PA) Pressure Monitoring

As with any procedure, there are potential risks involved with having a PA sensor implanted. Your doctor is the best source of information about risks. A small percentage of patients may develop complications from the procedure, including: Arrhythmias, Bleeding, Death, Device embolization, Hematoma, Infection, Myocardial infarction, Stroke, Transient ischemic attack and Thrombus.

Your PA sensor has built-in features that protect it from interference produced by most electrical equipment. Most of the things you handle or work around on a daily basis are not going to affect your sensor. Any type of electromagnetic interference such as theft detection systems and airport security systems, could make it difficult to take sensor measurements. It would be highly unlikely that you would be taking measurements at the same time that these devices are in your vicinity. Electric blankets or waterbeds could be the possible exception because they are found in the home and could be in the area when measurements are taken. If they are causing interference, you may want to move the electric blanket out of the room or in the case of a waterbed take the measurement in another room.

Consult your doctor about all possible benefits and risks.

CRT-P

A CRT-P monitors the heart’s rate and rhythm and provides electrical stimulation when the heart does not beat or beats too slowly. The CRT-P is designed for patients who have a slow heart rate.

As with any surgery, there are potential risks involved with having a CRT-P implanted. Your doctor is the best source of information about risks. A small percentage of patients may develop complications from the implant surgery, including bleeding, infection, lead dislodgement. Lead or device problems also can occur following surgery. Generally, risks depend on age, general health, specific medical condition and heart function.

After receiving a CRT-P, items with strong magnetic fields, including MRI machines, should be avoided. Some appliances and tools also can affect the device.

This device is available by prescription only and is not right for everyone. Individual results may vary. Consult your doctor about all possible benefits and risks.

CRT-D

CRT-D treats dangerously fast rhythm disorders called ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation in the lower chambers of the heart. The CRT-D sends a shock to the heart muscle to interrupt the rhythm disorder and allow the heart to resume its normal rhythm.

As with any surgery, there are potential risks involved with having a CRT-D implanted. Your doctor is the best source of information about risks. A small percentage of patients may develop complications from the implant surgery, including bleeding, infection, lead dislodgement. Lead or device problems also can occur following surgery. Generally, risks depend on age, general health, specific medical condition and heart function.

After receiving a CRT-D, items with strong magnetic fields, including MRI machines, should be avoided.

This device is available by prescription only and is not right for everyone. Individual results may vary.