Living With a PA Sensor

Getting a pulmonary artery (PA) sensor is an important decision and a big step forward for your health. But once the sensor is implanted, you’ll find the process is quite straightforward. Here are some answers to frequently asked questions. If you have any additional concerns, we encourage you to see your doctor.
Getting a pulmonary artery (PA) sensor is an important decision and a big step forward for your health. But once the sensor is implanted, you’ll find the process is quite straightforward. Here are some answers to frequently asked questions. If you have any additional concerns, we encourage you to see your doctor.

It’s important to take regular sensor readings, as instructed by your doctor, so he or she can monitor your PA pressure and identify any signs of worsening heart failure.

If you have a pacemaker or ICD, your PA sensor will not interfere with those devices, even when you’re taking a reading.

Your sensor will not alert or be affected by airport security when you pass through the metal detectors or scanning machines.

You may travel with your electronics system. We suggest you pack the unit in its carrying case and check it in as luggage.

You should carry your patient identification card with you at all times, in case of a medical event.

You should tell your doctor, dentist and emergency personnel that you have an implanted device.

When to Call Your Doctor

Your doctor may provide specific guidelines for when you should contact him or her. In general, call your doctor if you:

  • Have symptoms of worsening shortness of breath or chest pain.
  • Develop a fever that does not go away in two or three days.
  • Have questions about your device, HF condition or medications.
  • Notice anything unusual or unexpected, such as new symptoms that you have not had before.

 

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